French Slang Part 2: Le Verlan

French Slang Part 2: Le Verlan

This is part 2 of a series of posts on French Slang, composed by Simon Marion. He blog sites at Blog site French. Take a look at Part 1 here (nouns, verbs, and adjectives). If you have an interest in the French language, you may have currently found out about “le verlan”, which consists in inverting the order of the syllables in a word. Naturally, this is a truly casual method to speak in French, so any “verlan words” would be thought about slang. Nevertheless, a few of them ended up being so typical that you can discover them in the dictionary! Besides, verlan is in some cases more complex than it appears. Some words do not precisely represent the inverted syllables of the initial word, there can be some adjustments. For instance, the word “verlan” itself originates from the words “à l’envers”, which implies “upside down”. As you can see, the “à” was eliminated, and just the “l’envers” part was kept to invert the syllables. More details about the verlan here. Cimer > thank you (Initial word: “merci”) Une meuf > a female/ a woman/ a chick (Initial word: “une femme”) This one is really a bit the equivalent of “un mec” for ladies. It’s a bit challenging to utilize it due to the fact that some ladies do not like to be called like this. However if you’re not talking straight to her, it’s typically okay.– Elle est trop belle cette meuf. > That woman is so gorgeous.– Eh meuf, tu fais quoi ? > Hey woman, what are you doing? * note: It can likewise imply “sweetheart”: C’est qui Juliette?– C’est la meuf de Paul > Who’s Juliette. She’s Paul’s sweetheart. Un( e) renoi > a black guy/girl (Initial word: “un( e) noir( e)”) I would not advise to state the initial word “un noir” if you speak about a black individual (although it’s absolutely proper in French). It’s simply that depending upon who you talk (primarily more youthful individuals), individuals may take a look at you amusing. You might merely utilize the English word “un black”, or the Verlan word, for instance: Il y a plein de renois à Paris. > There’s a great deal of black men in Paris. Un( e) rebeu > an Arab (Initial word: “un beurre, which is another colloquial term to speak about an Arab individual”) France has plenty of individuals originating from Arabic nations (Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia particularly), so certainly we have a word them too. Mon pote Momo, c’est un rebeu, il est trop drôle. > My pal Momo, he’s Arab, he’s so amusing. Relou > annoying/bothersome (Initial word: “lourd” which actually implies “heavy” and is another colloquial term for “irritating”) Arrête ça, t’ es relou ! > Stop that, you’re irritating! Ouf > insane (Initial word: “fou”)– C’est un truc de ouf ! > That’s insane!/ That’s an insane thing!– Ce mec, c’est vraiment un ouf ! > That man is truly insane (an insane individual)! Chelou > strange, unusual, dodgy (Initial word: “louche”) C’est un peu chelou load histoire … > Your story is a bit strange … Une teuf > a celebration (Initial word: “une fête”) Ce soir on va faire la teuf ! > Tonight we’re gon na celebration! Vénère > upset, mad, upset (Initial word: “énervé”) Hier j’ étais vénère à cause de mon frère. > The other day I was upset due to the fact that of my bro * note: As you can see, the very first syllable “é” at the start of “énervé” is not pronounced at the end of “vénère”. Dupèr > lost (Initial word: “perdu”) This one is more in the sense of lost in your mind. For instance, when somebody does not comprehend what’s going on in a mathematics class, you might state half-jokingly: Toi t’ es vraiment duper. > Male, you’re entirely out of it. Téma > check out/ take a look at (Initial word: “mater”) Mater is currently a colloquial verb to state that you are gazing at something. It’s typically utilized in the essential to speak about something appealing (typically a man or a woman). I’m not so sure, however I believe the Verlan is more frequently utilized than the initial verb. Gros, téma la meuf en face. > Guy, take a look at that chick in front. Oim > me/ myself (Initial word: “moi”) Tu viens chez oim ou pas ? > You’re coming at my house or not? Thanks for dropping in! If you have an interest in more French slang, remain tuned! There will be a couple more posts from Simon Marion. Take a look at his website if you have an interest in discovering or studying French! Keep In Mind: Included Image by Daniele D’Andreti on Unsplash

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